Woman standing in front of pride flag (© Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Number of LGBTQI+ elected officials is growing in the United States

A new report shows that the number of LGBTQI+ elected officials in national, state and local government roles continues to rise in the U.S.
Street signs in New York City (© Shutterstock)

New York place names tell a story of diversity

Place names in the New York area have been influenced by Native American names and the languages of waves of immigrants. Learn more.
Lights shining from building at night (© John Mitchell/Alamy)

Confronting a century-old act of racism

September 4, 1907, was a dark day of racial intolerance in the city of Bellingham, Washington. Now, the town is reckoning with its past.
Female coach giving American football player in uniform instructions during practice (© Lee Coleman/Icon Sportswire/Getty Images)

Women tackle new opportunities in the NFL

The NFL will start the 2021 season with a record number of female coaches. Learn how the league is increasing women's roles in football.
Three young men posing and smiling with arms around each other (Courtesy of Waqas Idrees)

Muslim student associations create cultural ties in the U.S.

The Muslim Students Association of the U.S. & Canada helps bring students together on U.S. and Canadian university campuses. Learn more here.
Man sitting in front of piano (© Brynn Anderson/AP Images)

The African diaspora thrives in the United States

In honor of the U.N.'s first International Day for People of African Descent, learn about six notable Americans who have African ancestry.
Three people against wall, holding mirror and green fronds (© Courtesy of The Abrahamic House)

Abrahamic Houses: Urban hubs for interfaith understanding

The Abrahamic House initiative grew out of one man's interfaith journey. Learn how he now helps people of different faiths connect.
Brick building with white columns and dome seen through red flowers (© parkerphotography/Alamy)

Memorials can make history more inclusive

Learn how the current push for racial equality in the United States is prompting Americans to rethink their memorials and commemorations.
Pottery jar (Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Works by enslaved 19th-century artist now show in U.S. museums

David Drake, who was born enslaved, learned to read and write when it was illegal. His hundreds of ceramics with inscribed poetry were an act of resistance.