Barbecued meat on a platter (© Marie Sonmez Photography/Shutterstock)

Americans feel strongly about barbecue

Americans will fire up their barbecue grills for the Fourth of July. But what they eat depends on where they live. Learn how those regional styles formed.
Patrons using sign language in bar (State Dept./D.A. Peterson)

Sign-language-friendly businesses take off

A growing number of deaf-friendly and signing-first businesses — which use sign language as their primary form of communication — are opening in the U.S.
Black T-shirts with NBA team logos in rainbow colors (GLSEN)

Pro basketball teams show pride

During the National Basketball Association championship, players show off their skills on the court and their support for LGBTI rights.
People eating at the Asian Garden Mall in California (© AP Images)

Asian culture spices up America’s mealtimes

Japanese, Thai, Korean, Indian, Burmese and other Asian cuisines are increasingly available in grocery stores and restaurants in the United States.
Women praying in shadows (© Getty Images/Allen J. Schaben)

In pictures: A look back at American Muslims during Ramadan

Like other Muslims around the world, American Muslims observe the holy month of Ramadan. See how they pray, fast and feast around the U.S.
People with hands raised (© AP Images)

Becoming a U.S. citizen on July 4

Immigrants from around the world will be sworn in as naturalized U.S. citizens just as the United States celebrates its birthday on the Fourth of July.
Women in blue dresses dancing onstage (© Ali Khaligh)

Persian New Year celebrations spring up across the U.S.

Each spring, Iranian Americans and others organize Nowruz festivals and events in the U.S. to welcome the New Year and pay tribute to their cultural heritage.
Girl speaking at lectern in front of large group of people at the Lincoln Memorial (State Dept.)

Students embrace the words of Martin Luther King Jr. [video]

On Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday, January 15, fifth-graders from a Washington school recite King's most famous speech from the Lincoln Memorial steps.
Two Frederick Douglass quarters resting on old books (U.S. Mint)

New coin honors Frederick Douglass

The U.S. has a new coin featuring Frederick Douglass, a prominent African American who escaped slavery in 1838 and later became a statesman.