Solar panels in circle around tower in middle of plain (Courtesy of SolarReserve)

Salting away renewable energy for future use

Molten salt could be the key to unlocking a future full of renewable energy. During peak times the salt stores solar power that can be saved and used later.

Need strategies to clear the air? Ask a megacity.

Big cities have big problems with pollution and are big laboratories for solutions. C40 Cities helps them collaborate on strategies.
Guide with stick and John Kerry walking on path through ice (State Dept.)

Secretary Kerry witnesses changing ice in Antarctica

Despite the Paris agreement to cut emissions causing the planet to warm, "we haven't won the battle yet," Kerry told young climate scientists in Antarctica.
Close-up of electricity meter (Shutterstock)

Want cheap electricity? Try net metering.

Homeowners and businesses that rely on solar panels and wind turbines have cheaper electric bills, thanks to a system called “net metering.”
Electric car plugged into charging station (© AP Images)

Electric cars could dominate some city roads sooner than you think

Falling costs for the technology powering electric cars and stricter emissions regulation are among the reasons electric vehicles are becoming more popular.
Two people in canoe on lake in foreground; forest with autumn foliage in background (© AP Images)

Hundreds of U.S. businesses voice support for climate agreement

Over 300 U.S. businesses, many from the Fortune 500, signed a statement renewing private-sector support for the Paris agreement on climate change.

Obama calls climate change our biggest threat

In his 2015 State of the Union address, President Obama touched on a range of global challenges, but declared the environment his top concern. “No challenge...
Workmen installing solar panels on building rooftop (U.S. Department of Energy)

Big roofs mean big solar at top U.S. retailers

If U.S. supermarkets and shopping centers covered underused roof space with solar panels, it could generate enough clean energy for several million homes.
Destiny Watford standing near Baltimore harbor with smoke pluming from industrial buildings in the background (Courtesy of Goldman Environmental Prize)

‘Shy’ teen found her voice to fight pollution

Do you think good health is a human right? Destiny Watford does, which is why she fought plans to build a massive trash incinerator in her neighborhood.