Star eaters: How black hole winds blow

Supermassive black holes at the cores of galaxies blast radiation and ultra-fast winds outward, as illustrated in this artist's rendering based on an image...
Two young women running down flight of steps (State Dept./D.A. Peterson)

Ready for a daytrip? We’ll bring the math.

Math and leisure don't always go hand-in-hand, but these students have calculated the best way to see U.S. sights in a short amount of time.
Group of students standing behind robot (State Dept./D.A. Peterson)

U.S. hosts Syrian robotics team

Living in a refugee camp didn't hold back these five promising teenagers from building a robot and qualifying for a world-renowned robotics competition.

Catch a breeze. Turn on the lights. Wind power is growing...

Wind power will turn on the lights in 35 percent of U.S. homes by 2050, preventing millions of tons of greenhouse gases and other polluting emissions.
Girl using screwdriver to assemble machine (Shutterstock)

Ivanka Trump announces large private-sector pledge for computer education

CEOs joined Ivanka Trump to build access to computer-science classes with $300 million. The private-sector push complements administration STEM efforts.
Overhead view of crowd next to cars filling street (© AP Images)

Iran shuts down internet access to hide protests

Despite reports that the Iranian regime has cut internet access to stymie citizen protests, Iranians are still finding ways to post protest images online.
A passenger jet with solar panels in foreground (Getty Images)

Airports look to the sun to save money

Airports around the world are looking sunward to power their facilities — and they find solar energy makes good business sense.
Virtual statue in front of Lincoln Memorial (State Dept.)video

New app builds monuments to scientific geniuses [video]

A free new augmented reality app unveils the stories of people who changed the worlds of science, technology, engineering and math.
Aerial view of island that has energy grid (Courtesy of NantEnergy)

The future of battery technology is in the air

Batteries from the U.S. that rely on zinc and air may be the future of renewable energy. Eight countries in Africa, Asia and the Americas are using them.