Cormac the llama in a field (Courtesy of Triple J Farms)

Llama antibodies could protect against COVID-19

Small antibodies, known as nanobodies, taken from a llama could prove to be effective against COVID-19. Read more about U.S. medical research.
Woman with coffee in glass flasks (Matt Biddulph/Blue Bottle Cafe)

Science Cafes: Grab a coffee. Talk about astrophysics.

These days, you don’t have to attend a lecture to learn about science. Just visit your local cafe. People anywhere can attend informal, grassroots-organized talks...
Wax likeness of Johnny Depp as Jack Sparrow character (© Ferdaus Shamim/WireImage/Getty Images)

Pirates in movies are fun, but movie piracy hurts

Movie piracy doesn't just hurt wealthy movie studios. It robs workers of their pay and hurts economies. The Trump administration aims to stop such piracy.
The Summit, a scientific supercomputer (Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Carlos Jones)

U.S. supercomputers take aim at coronavirus

Able to perform trillions of calculations per second, the most powerful supercomputers in the world are joining the fight against the new coronavirus.
Drawing of a caravan stop on the Silk Road (© Eugene Flandin/Alamy)

Following the Afghan Silk Road with satellites

Archaeologist Emily Boak used aerial and satellite imagery to discover hundreds of unrecorded Afghan caravan stops along the Silk Road.
Girls wearing safety goggles sitting at lab table (Courtesy of MEDO)

Schoolgirls help build Africa’s first private satellite

South Africa is getting its first private satellite, thanks to an ambitious group of schoolgirls and the Meta Economic Development Organization.
Drawing of scientist at work with huge microscope examining the work (State Dept./D. Thompson)

U.S. scientists invite careful scrutiny

In a world where scientists are eager to publish their discoveries and phony research is on the rise, learn how one journal weeds out bad science.
Graphic design showing a lock and an illustration representing cybertechnology (Shutterstock)

U.S.-led cybersecurity contest gets more global

Thousands of students from around the world are taking part in a global cybersecurity contest aimed at finding talent and boosting interest in the field.
Illustration of a uniformed Chinese official holding a cellphone with an eyeball on its screen (State Dept./D. Thompson)

China’s surveillance app

The Chinese government is using special mobile apps to watch ethnic minorities in Xinjiang, cataloging and recording their every move.