Man walking along flooded street (© AP Images)

This tech tool helps communities prep for climate change

Cities around the world are getting granular with climate data, using a new tool called PREP to prepare for the local effects of climate change.
Wind turbines (© AP Images)

Google set to go 100 percent renewable

By 2017, Google expects to power its massive data centers and offices with 100 percent renewable energy, everywhere in the world.
Three men holding solar panel (© AP Images)

Solar energy comes in big and small packages

Different technologies capture the sun's light or heat to generate power. It may be done on a large or small scale.
Aerial view of solar panels surrounded by forest on island (SolarCity)

U.S. island in South Pacific goes solar

Remote Ta'ū Island in American Samoa switched from burning 300 gallons of diesel fuel a day to nearly 100 percent solar power. How did they do it?
Cartoon drawing of cat driving car (State Dept.)video

The adventures of ‘Energy Cat’ [video]

The cat is out of the bag: Renewable energy is the future. Thomas, the Energy Cat, tells us how all the sun and wind around us can power the planet.
People in winter coats walking on barren ground, hut in background (State Dept.)video

Kerry: World should keep moving forward on climate change [video]

It's been a historic year in the fight against climate change, but we can't stop now, John Kerry said at the U.N. climate conference in Morocco.
Close-up image of melting glacier (© AP Images)

No plan for climate change? Risky investment, agencies say.

Even before nearly 200 countries reached the historic Paris climate agreement in 2015, credit rating agencies had been evaluating companies' climate risk.
Illustration of figure plugging in to giant outlet (State Dept./Doug Thompson)

What is the power grid and how does it work?

Did you know you are looking at part of the power grid every time you see power transmission lines? How does renewable energy become part of the grid?
Power plant smokestacks emitting carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases (Shutterstock)

Castles in the air? Carbon dioxide could produce building materials.

A new technique that takes CO2 emissions generated by factories and cars could create new material for buildings, aircraft and athletic equipment.