World religions: Caring for our planet is a moral duty

Growing numbers of religious groups regard care of the planet as a moral duty and are becoming advocates for stronger environmental protections.
Power plant smokestacks emitting carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases (Shutterstock)

Castles in the air? Carbon dioxide could produce building materials.

A new technique that takes CO2 emissions generated by factories and cars could create new material for buildings, aircraft and athletic equipment.

Costs to Crimea: Coerced citizenship

One year ago, on March 16, Russia orchestrated an illegal referendum in Crimea that violated the Ukrainian constitution and was condemned by the international...
Painting of Benjamin Franklin reading at desk (White House Historical Association)

On becoming an ‘ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary’

Good foreign relations are vital for every country. Learn about America's first ambassador, Benjamin Franklin, and how someone becomes an ambassador.

75 percent of Ebola victims are women

Ebola can infect anyone who does not take the necessary and simple health precautions. Women, however, represent 75 percent of Ebola-related deaths. Why women? Ebola spreads through...
Woman standing among corn stalks (AUN-API)

After escaping Boko Haram, farmers begin a new season with hope

Once displaced by chaos caused by the Boko Haram terrorist organization, thousands of Nigerian farmers are cultivating again.
President Trump and Malcom Turnbull seated and shaking hands (© AP Images)

Why did Trump and Turnbull meet on an aircraft carrier?

President Trump emphasized “the enduring bonds, deep friendship and close alliance" between the U.S. and Australia with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull.
Kenyan children standing outside (© AP Images)

See why Kenya’s child TB deaths are expected to fall

Kenya will be the first country to roll out a national program providing TB medicines in sweet flavors to encourage children to take their full doses.

Delivering hope to mothers

Mother’s Delivery Kits could save the lives of thousands of women in Nigeria each year. Now they're expanding across Africa.