Gloved hand lifting vial from box of them (© Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images)

Vaccines save lives

Vaccines against infectious diseases save millions of lives. See how U.S. innovators are contributing to global efforts to stop COVID-19 and other diseases.

75 percent of Ebola victims are women

Ebola can infect anyone who does not take the necessary and simple health precautions. Women, however, represent 75 percent of Ebola-related deaths. Why women? Ebola spreads through...
A World Health Organization worker trains Ebola health workers to use protective gear in Freetown, Sierra Leone.

Health workers face Ebola’s psychological effects

For some health workers, addressing the psychological effects of the Ebola epidemic in Liberia is as important as prevention or treatment. Battling death and rumors Rumors...

This is what dirty air does to your body

When we live in cities, we breathe dirty air, which is bad for us. It causes many diseases. But there are ways to stop the pollution.

35 million people worldwide have HIV/AIDS. Do something about it on...

What do 35 million people worldwide have in common? An HIV-positive diagnosis. What they don’t have in common is equal access to treatment. To close...
Hands holding a petri dish (© Branden Camp/AP Images)

What is the CDC’s role during the coronavirus crisis?

Learn what the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention does to help keep people healthy around the world, especially in light of a new coronavirus.
People lying in beds and others standing by them (© Xiong Qi/Xinhua/Getty)

U.S. commits millions to combat coronavirus

The U.S. government is donating millions to fight the new coronavirus. Learn how the money will support global efforts to prevent new infections.
Silhouettes of students in caps and gowns with U.S. flag in background (© Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. universities adapt to help international students

With a public health crisis reshaping the new academic year, U.S. universities are offering expanded resources to help international students thrive.
Manu Prakash holding string with paper circle suspended on it (Kurt Hickman/Stanford News Service)

How a toy became a medical miracle

Inspired by a whirligig, a Stanford researcher developed a 20-cent paper centrifuge that could revolutionize health care diagnosis around the world.