Mike Pence speaking at a lectern (@ Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP Images)

Pence: U.S. stands for religious freedom ‘yesterday, today and always’

Vice President Pence affirmed the United States' deep commitment to religious freedom worldwide in his remarks to the Ministerial to Advance Religious Freedom.
Woman standing in front of row of coats looking at book (© Alexander Aksakov/The Washington Post/Getty Images)

Jehovah’s Witnesses: Champions of religious freedom

Jehovah's Witnesses are law-abiding people of faith who follow a unique interpretation of the Bible. Russia's Supreme Court decided Witnesses' views make them “extremists,” and now 50 face criminal prosecution.
Nelson Mandela waving to crowd (© David Longstreth/AP Images)

Nelson Mandela’s 100th birthday: A look back at visits to the...

South Africa's first black president inspired Americans with each of his visits to the U.S. before he died in 2013. Nelson Mandela still does in 2018, the centenary of his birth.
Map with regions of Africa highlighted (State Dept./S. Gemeny Wilkinson)

The growing power of young people [infographic]

While effects can vary, the growing majorities of young people in Africa and elsewhere will undoubtedly have a strong impact on their societies.
Crowd seen through bars (© File/AP Images)

Shareable graphics on Iran’s instability

Download these shareable graphics from Secretary of State Mike Pompeo about factors spurring instability in Iran.
Four pop culture images with lines through them (Shutterstock/State Dept./S. Gemeny Wilkinson)

Banning Barbie and Bart?

Freedom of expression is a fundamental U.S. right, but in some countries, governments take the extraordinary measure of blocking what their citizens can see and hear.
Cartoon drawing of man in tiger suit riding a donkey (© Bettmann/Getty Images)

In the U.S., people power dismantled political machines

A century ago, corrupt political machines that made their leaders rich thrived in U.S. cities. But people came together to reform the system.
Reporter's notebook and hat, megaphone, radio, TV, laptop and phone on presidential seal (State Dept./Doug Thompson)

From fireside chats to Twitter, presidents speak to the people

From "fireside chats" on the radio to Twitter, presidents going back a century have adopted the latest technologies to communicate with the American people.
Five portrait photos of women superimposed on a U.S. map (Photos 1 and 5, courtesy photos; photos 2, 3, and 4 © AP Images; background photo, Shutterstock)

Women govern some of the largest U.S. cities

Learn about some of the American women who are running for, and winning, the top city government seat: the mayor.