Boy with painted hand (© AP Images)

How some countries involve citizens in governing

“Open government” should never be an oxymoron. More national governments are making sure the phrase isn't one by increasing their transparency.
Police officer wearing body camera (© AP Images)

In the U.S., cameras mean transparent policing

Cameras are common in American policing. Who gets to see all those hours of footage of police interacting with the public?
Man in black hat furtively touching silver metal briefcase (Shutterstock)

I paid a bribe and I’ll tell you about it online

Entrepreneurs and activists are using technology to fight corruption and graft, and the cultures that create it.
Drawing of hand holding magnifying glass over spreadsheet (State Dept./Doug Thompson)

4 ways you can hold officials accountable

Is your government transparent? Knowing what elected officials say, do and spend is vital to an open government. Here's how you can keep tabs on officials.
Hand holding cellphone aloft

Delete corruption from the palm of your hand [video]

Your country may not have the resources to monitor and enforce anti-corruption laws, but thanks to new technologies, you can help expose corruption.
Drawing of two men exchanging bribe while flashlight shines on money (State Department/Doug Thompson)

Stopping corruption might seem impossible. But there are simple ways to...

Every year, $3.5 trillion is paid in bribes or stolen by corrupt officials. Stopping graft might seem impossible. But there are simple ways to fight it.
Illustration of a police officer standing under the scales of justice (State Dept./D. Thompson)

Here’s how police are held accountable in shooting incidents [video]

When a U.S. police officer is involved in a shooting, departments - often with civilian oversight - investigate to see if the officer should be prosecuted.
Police officer in uniform (© AP Images)

3 police chiefs on race and policing

Three police chiefs in the U.S. address perceptions of law enforcement and how their departments are improving their communities.
Person riding hoverboard at night (© AP Images)

Who do you call when products don’t work?

When products are faulty and harmful, businesses issue a recall and work with government agencies to publicize the recall and how to get the product fixed.