View looking up at U.S. Capitol dome (© AP Images)

Government transparency depends on freedom of information

Since the 1960s, the Freedom of Information Act has kept Americans in the know about what their government is doing.
Stacks of files (© Shutterstock)

How freedom of information works

For 50 years, the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) has increased transparency by giving Americans the right to examine records from federal agencies.
Illustration of public official crowdsurfing on crowd's hands (State Dept./D. Thompson)

A TV contest makes officials famous for doing good

Rather than shame corrupt officials, the Integrity Idol TV contest honors the most honest officials and treats them like rock stars.
Three men talking (Courtesy of Richard Lui)

So you want to be a TV reporter … [video]

Get tips from award-winning news anchor Richard Lui to see if you have what it takes to be a broadcast journalist.
Two people talking (Refined Creative)

Want to fight corruption? Follow the money.

An organization in Nigeria scours government databases and social media to empower local communities to root out corruption and make sure promises are kept.
Woman in shadows looking at glowing laptop screen (© AP Images)

How do you know if what you’re seeing online is true?

How can you see past hoaxes? Learn how you can confirm photos and video footage, and fact-check what you see online.
Illustration of hands on computer keyboard with government building on screen (State Dept./Doug Thompson)

E-government is becoming a thing

Technology makes government operations more transparent and delivery of services more efficient and less costly. It’s often called e-government.
Boy with painted hand (© AP Images)

How some countries involve citizens in governing

“Open government” should never be an oxymoron. More national governments are making sure the phrase isn't one by increasing their transparency.
Police officer wearing body camera (© AP Images)

In the U.S., cameras mean transparent policing

Cameras are common in American policing. Who gets to see all those hours of footage of police interacting with the public?