How science works in the U.S.

The U.S. scientific culture encourages new discoveries. It does it through collaboration, public funding, open science, peer review and outreach.
Doctor holding stethoscope to child's chest (USAID/Daniel Lanari)

Database offers transparency on U.S. foreign aid

The Foreign Aid Explorer, a free, comprehensive, interactive database, helps users see what the United States spends on foreign aid.
Drawing of scientist at work with huge microscope examining the work (State Dept./D. Thompson)

U.S. scientists invite careful scrutiny

In a world where scientists are eager to publish their discoveries and phony research is on the rise, learn how one journal weeds out bad science.
View of large building behind red and white barrier fencing (© Thomas Peter/Reuters)

Why does China ‘retrain’ successful businessmen?

The Chinese government calls internment camps in Xinjiang "vocational training centers," but a widely distributed photo tells a different story
President Obama at microphone (© AP Images)

Obama: Open government ‘is at the heart of successful societies’ [video]

Check out what President Obama told this year's Open Government Partnership summit.
Two images of Anas Aremeyaw Anas with mask and microphone (State Dept.)

Behind the mask, an unconventional African journalist [video]

Journalists play an important role in civil society by shining a light on wrongdoing and exposing corruption. See how far this journalist goes.
Hand holding cellphone aloft

Delete corruption from the palm of your hand [video]

Your country may not have the resources to monitor and enforce anti-corruption laws, but thanks to new technologies, you can help expose corruption.
Illustration of pencil erasing image on cellphone of tank with lone man standing in front of it (State Dept./D. Thompson)

What does it mean when your technology comes from China?

The Chinese Communist Party's authoritarian control over China means that using technology developed in the country carries significant risks.
Two people surrounded by scientific equipment, papers and a chalkboard (© Bill Denison/Drew University/Getty Images)

How the U.S. protects academic freedom

Academic freedom — the ability to study, learn, collaborate and publish freely — is essential to research and innovation, and it must be protected.