Campus Life

Two people surrounded by scientific equipment, papers and a chalkboard (© Bill Denison/Drew University/Getty Images)

How the U.S. protects academic freedom

Academic freedom — the ability to study, learn, collaborate and publish freely — is essential to research and innovation, and it must be protected.
Woman and man in TV studio (© Luis Gorotiza)

Tips from an expert: Navigating a U.S. university

An EducationUSA adviser tells you what's most important to get a college education in the U.S. and what her own U.S. education was like.
People writing on desk with replica skulls on it (© Ricky Carioti/Washington Post/Getty Images)

Students with disabilities excel at American universities

At American universities, students with disabilities get accommodation and support in addition to access to great academics.
Students eating lunch in a cafeteria (© David Zalubowski/AP Images)

Chinese students welcome at U.S. schools

The U.S. values Chinese exchange students in its schools and affords them numerous ways to participate in their new communities.
Illustration of a man in a suit releasing a book in the air like a bird (State Dept./D. Thompson)

Academic freedom matters for everyone

Learn why academic freedom — the freedom to preserve truth and share information — is important to more than just professors and students.
Drawing of student using diploma as megaphone (State Dept./D. Thompson)

Study in the U.S. … and speak out

What rights do international students have? The right to free speech lets every student in the U.S. ask big questions in and out of the classroom.
Athletes holding up a trophy as blue confetti comes down on them (© David J. Phillip/AP Images)

March Madness explained

If you come to study in the U.S., you’ll find that this is the time of year when college students and other Americans become obsessed with March Madness.
People sitting in grassy area in a circle playing drums, with building in distance (© RosaIreneBetancourt 7/Alamy)

The world comes to America to study [infographic]

Science, engineering and business classes are big draws for international students, but U.S. colleges also prepare them for leadership back home.
People sitting in large room with tall glass walls (© Northwestern University in Qatar)

U.S. universities deliver at worldwide branches

Getting an American-style education outside the U.S. is now a little bit easier, thanks to the growing number of international branch campuses.