Congress

Large group of men and women standing with right hands raised (© Al Drago/Bloomberg/Getty Images)

Get to know the 116th Congress

In four graphics, we take a look at the 116th Congress, including the historic number of women, as well as a bit about their backgrounds.
Person giving speech in large, crowded room (© AP Images)

Who sits where during a State of the Union speech? [infographic]

The three branches of the U.S. government get together each year to hear the president give the State of the Union address. Who comes and where do they sit?
Color-coded seating chart

How will the 2018 elections change the U.S. Congress?

See how the midterm elections of 2018 affected the two major parties' control in Congress and the gains women made in representation in Congress.
Person peeling off "I voted" sticker (© Richard Drew/AP Images)

In U.S., November national elections have long history

Learn why U.S. national elections are held on Tuesdays in November, and why that's unlikely to change — even though some people think it should.
Capitol building behind Supreme Court (© Shutterstock)

What are midterm elections, and why are they important?

Although Americans won't elect a president in the 2018 midterm elections, their choices will have a big effect on the country's direction.
John J. Sullivan speaking at a podium (© Jose Luis Magana/AP Images)

Meet U.S. Acting Secretary of State Sullivan

During this transition period between secretaries of state, a steady hand takes charge and career employees continue their work supporting the president's foreign policies.
Illustration of a man swearing in before a Senate hearing (State Dept./Doug Thompson)

How does Senate confirmation work?

Before nominees for Cabinet positions can start work, they have one important hurdle to clear: the Senate confirmation process.
Donald Trump and Mike Pence side by side, with Trump pointing at Pence (© AP Images)

What do U.S. vice presidents do?

Vice presidents play a big role in the U.S. government. They are first in line to succeed the president and serve as emissaries, counselors and advisers.
Illustration of buildings with arrows leading to others of different sizes and people (State Dept./Doug Thompson)

Federal government: More than the White House and Congress

Learn more about the federal government in the United States. This article is part of a three-part series on how federalism works in America.