Freedom Of Expression

Statue of Liberty in front of U.S. Constitutionvideo

Freedom of speech is not just about words [video]

In the United States, freedom of speech extends beyond spoken words. See the many forms of expression that are protected by the U.S. Constitution.
Taxicabs lined on city street at night (© Kholood Eid/The New York Times/Redux)

How do journalists win Pulitzers?

Pulitzer Prizes recognize impactful American journalism, whether it's in the form of words, cartoons, photos or the spoken word. Learn why that matters.
Mike Pompeo speaking at lectern (© Jessica McGowan/Getty Images)

Pompeo urges U.S. colleges to defend academic freedom

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo urged U.S. universities to protect academic freedom from the Chinese Communist Party's attempts to undermine it.
Group of people, one taking a selfie, at night (© Yamil Lage/AFP/Getty Images)

Cuba, Nicaragua and Venezuela strike out against free speech

The authoritarian regimes in Cuba, Nicaragua and Venezuela are cracking down on their citizens' freedoms of speech and of the press.
Franklin Delano Roosevelt at lectern with many microphones as two men sit behind him (© AP Images)

Promoting human rights is essential to U.S. policy

Almost 80 years after President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's famous Four Freedoms speech, the United States continues to champion human rights abroad.
Four suited men carrying man (© Kin Cheung/AP Images)

Democracies condemn Beijing’s continued crackdown in Hong Kong

Beijing's crackdown on democracy continues with the disqualification of several pro-democracy lawmakers from the Hong Kong legislature.
Man standing in street with hand to face (© AFP/Getty Images)

Rights groups call for independent investigation of Iran’s atrocities

Human rights groups are calling for an independent inquiry into violence against Iranian protesters. Read more about calls for transparency in Iran.
Hands in handcuffs resting on table around microphone held by gloved hand (State Dept./D. Thompson)

The truth behind China’s forced confessions

The Chinese Communist Party coerces confessions from critics and human rights activists and then publicizes the confessions for propaganda.
Illustration of two men in military uniform, one using scissors to cut filmstrip with images of ghosts (State Dept./D. Thompson)

Why is the Chinese Communist Party afraid of ghosts?

The Chinese Communist Party bans movies about ghosts and time travel as part of a censorship regime that stifles criticism.