Girls’ Education

Two young girls displaying the wares of their business on a table (© Lemonade Day)

Young entrepreneurs learn that business can be sweet

How does a lemonade stand turn into a full-fledged business? Programs designed to inspire young entrepreneurs teach American children valuable skills.
Sandra Cauffman seated, at microphone (State Dept./D.A. Peterson)

Her improbable dream led to NASA

Learn how watching American astronaut Neil Armstrong's 1969 landing on the moon inspired a 7-year-old Costa Rican girl to pursue a career at NASA.
Girls holding up brightly colored cloth bags (© Jeana Nash)

Giving a million girls ‘their days back’

Learn how a major problem affecting the health, education and dignity of millions of women and girls around the world can be fixed right now.

Invest in girls. Download this free poster.

Girls make up half the world's population, but many lack opportunities to learn skills. Support girls' ability to gain training for good jobs.
Melania Trump walking past women waving flags (© Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Melania Trump delivers books, balls and hope in Malawi

Melania Trump, in Africa, saw up close the needs of Malawi's children at a school with 110 pupils per teacher. The U.S. donates millions of books to Malawi.
People sitting in large room with tall glass walls (© Northwestern University in Qatar)

U.S. universities deliver at worldwide branches

Getting an American-style education outside the U.S. is now a little bit easier, thanks to the growing number of international branch campuses.
Five children in a row holding books up to their faces (© Wavebreak Media Ltd./Alamy)

5 ways the U.S. supports literacy around the world

Find out how the U.S. is helping to build a literate world where everyone has an equal chance to succeed in life and work.
Karlie Kloss and three young women sitting around a table (© George Etheredge/The New York Times/Redux)

Learning to code with model Karlie Kloss [video]

Find out how model Karlie Kloss' curiosity about how Instagram worked ultimately helped more than 1,000 girls and young women in America learn how to code.
Hands typing on laptop computer (Shutterstock)

Afghan girls code out opium

Young women in Afghanistan are learning how to code — and how to speak up on national issues. Students at Code to Inspire, a computer science program for girls, built a game to call out the Taliban's opium trade.