health technologies

Hands holding syringe and vial (© Shutterstock)

U.S. scientists work tirelessly on coronavirus vaccines

Work is underway on treatments and a vaccine to combat the new coronavirus. See how U.S. innovators are fighting to keep Americans and the world safe.
Illustration showing EKG and heart (© Shutterstock)

Using artificial intelligence to help fight heart disease

U.S. companies are using artificial intelligence to improve medical care. Learn how new software will lead to early detection of heart disease.
Images sitting in rows, with data in margins (© Evgeniy Kalinovskiy/Shutterstock)

Diagnosing brain cancer with the help of artificial intelligence

A recent study shows artificial intelligence was as successful as doctors at diagnosing cancer — and was much faster, too.
Clusters of rod-shaped and spherical bacteria (© Shutterstock) (

U.S. innovation is fighting antibiotic-resistant diseases

Antibiotic-resistant diseases are being tackled head-on by U.S. government agencies with fast-track funding of bold ideas.
Two women looking at tablets (USAID)

Mapping Niger to deliver malaria medicines

A U.S.-backed program is helping to get malaria medicine delivered in Niger by making sure maps accurately show the location of health facilities.
Colorized microscope image showing cells (© Janice Haney Carr/CDC/Sickle Cell Foundation of Georgia)

New U.S. sickle cell drug brings hope

U.S. regulators have approved a California company’s new therapy for treating sickle cell disease, a painful and life-threatening inherited blood disorder.
People in processing plant wearing protective clothing (© Tyrone Turner)

Safety comes first for U.S. food and drug exports

The U.S. system of inspecting food, medicines and other products is a showcase for the world, with federal agencies maintaining exacting standards.
Health worker administering vaccine (© Olivia Acland/Reuters)

U.S. researchers look for long-lasting Ebola vaccine

U.S. researchers are testing two new Ebola vaccines in a clinical trial, hoping to offer long-lasting immunity against deadly strains of the Ebola virus.
Worker wearing gloves handling a box of vials (© Carolyn Kaster/AP Images)

Working toward beating the flu with a universal vaccine

In a single shot, a universal vaccine could protect patients for their lifetime from multiple existing or future strains of influenza virus.