Reducing Waste

Worker stacking Coca-Cola cases filled with empty glass bottles (© Chau Doan/LightRocket/Getty Images)

U.S. companies raise the bar on recycling

The unsightly plastics that clog the ocean and defile beaches often cannot be recycled. One major U.S. company has a plan to recycle one soda can or bottle for every one sold, while another has pioneered a novel way to recycle beach plastic.
Young woman with face mask on beach, collecting trash in plastic bag (Shutterstock)

The ocean needs your help — and your phone — this...

Since 1985, millions of people have removed a supertanker's weight of plastic trash from beaches as part of the annual International Coastal Cleanup Day.
Child walking through trash-infested waters (© Solo Imaji/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

Keeping plastics out of our oceans

Managing waste so that it doesn’t end up in our oceans is a worldwide challenge. Get tips from researcher Jenna Jambeck on how to reduce plastic pollution.
Mr. Trash Wheel in water (Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore)

Meet Mr. Trash Wheel, hero of Baltimore harbor

A water wheel in Baltimore, named "Mr. Trash Wheel" by residents, is churning up ideas for cleaning coastal cities around the world.
Electronic waste (© AP Images)

Could these end up in Tokyo’s Olympic medals?

The 5,000 medals of the 2020 Olympics and Paralympics will feature metals — including 40 kilograms of gold — reclaimed from discarded electronic devices.
Man carrying net through newly grown mangrove forest (© Interface)

Recycling castaway fishing nets into skateboards and carpets

American companies are recycling nylon from tons of nets collected in fishing villages along Chile’s Pacific coast and in the Philippines.
Man wearing soccer uniform falling backward into water (Courtesy of Adidas)

Soccer teams take the field wearing ocean trash

What can be done about ocean trash? We can turn it into clothing, for starters. See how these soccer teams take recycling to a new level.
Silhouette of angel fish in front of plastic bottles (State Dept./L. Rawls)

Our ocean should be trash-free

Scientists estimate that by 2050 there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish. It's not too late to act and protect #OurOcean: Learn what you can do.
Shoreline covered with plastic soda bottles (Shutterstock)

Tide turns against plastic ocean pollution

From the deep sea to Arctic ice, oceans are under enormous stress from millions of tons of plastic trash, which can remain in the environment for centuries.