technology

Illustration of a girl writing math equations on a blackboard (State Dept./Doug Thompson)

Math and science have no gender

In most countries, boys are more likely than girls to excel in math and science. That is starting to change, thanks to a push by countries and educators.
Drawing of tanker ship approaching coast (State Dept./D. Thompson)

Why should you care about liquefied natural gas?

Liquefied natural gas, or LNG, can be put onto ships and delivered anywhere in the world. That's a big deal for countries' energy security.
Tim Cook, President Trump and Satya Nadella sitting at table (© AP Images)

Top tech officials meet with President Trump to help modernize government

The president brought technology leaders from major companies like Apple and Amazon to the White House for the launch of the American Technology Council.
Man working on gas turbine in German factory (© AP Images)

President Trump pushes for more apprenticeships

The president is advocating for more training programs to fill high-salaried, high-tech jobs that don’t require college diplomas.
Ying McGuire (Courtesy of Ying McGuire)

From China to Texas: An executive’s success story

Ying McGuire immigrated to the United States from China to earn a master’s degree and now is vice president of a global technology-solutions company.
Person in safety gear between floor-to-ceiling racks of pipes (© AP Images)

Israeli technology helps quench California’s thirst for water

California, the most populous state in the U.S., has pulled out from a historic drought thanks to help from Israel's water technology.
Man painting Urdu words on a wall (© AP Images)

Combating violence with art or apps

An art program, an online forum and a crime-fighting app are three ways emerging young leaders are strengthening their communities.
Man sitting in front of computer monitors (Kudelski Group)

For a Swiss tech firm’s 2nd headquarters, the U.S. was an...

When the Swiss tech firm Kudelski looked at where to open a second headquarters, it made what executives say was a logical choice: the United States.
Ashanti Johnson (Courtesy of Ashanti Johnson)

Oceanographer casts wide net for young talent

Ashanti Johnson, the first African American to earn a degree in marine science from Texas A&M University-Galveston, knows about breaking barriers.