Visas

Sunlight on Statue of Liberty (© Cla78/Shutterstock)

Biden ends discriminatory immigration bans

President Biden has revoked an executive order and three proclamations that restricted immigration visas for people from many Muslim and African countries.
Three people smiling (© Kyle Klein Perler/Arts Connect International)

Building bridges through cultural exchange

The State Department's Exchange Visitor Program is now called BridgeUSA, emphasizing private-sector opportunities for people who wish to work in the U.S.

U.S. imposes visa restrictions on Chinese officials for human rights violations...

Chinese officials who are taking part in the ongoing persecution of Uyghur and other Muslim ethnic minorities are now restricted from traveling to the U.S.
Students eating lunch in a cafeteria (© David Zalubowski/AP Images)

Chinese students welcome at U.S. schools

The U.S. values Chinese exchange students in its schools and affords them numerous ways to participate in their new communities.
Drawing of student using diploma as megaphone (State Dept./D. Thompson)

Study in the U.S. … and speak out

What rights do international students have? The right to free speech lets every student in the U.S. ask big questions in and out of the classroom.
Barbed wire silhouette in front of a blood red sky (Shutterstock)

New sanctions target corrupt actors, rights abusers

President Trump's new sanctions — the first related to the 2016 Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act — target human rights abusers worldwide.
Students in purple graduation robes cheering (© Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images)

International students a boon for U.S. universities — and vice versa

International student enrollments at U.S. colleges broke 1 million again. Both the students and the schools benefit from their relationships.
Group of men standing by truck in dry landscape (© Isaiah Nengo)

Two-year colleges open new worlds for students

Almost 100,000 international students attend U.S. two-year colleges, where they can learn English and get credits to apply toward four-year college degrees.
Plane (Thinkstock)

How the new travel order works

President Trump's executive order pauses admission of foreign nationals from six countries to let the U.S. review the vetting process for visas.