wildlife conservation

Waterfall in forest by body of water (© Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket/Getty Images)

Biden administration restores protections for Tongass National Forest

The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently announced new protections for the nation's largest national forest, which houses over 400 species of wildlife.
Poster with drawings of pollinators and text saying "Protect pollinators" (State Dept.)

Download this poster and protect pollinators

Pollinators are under threat from diseases, pesticides and habitat loss. Download this poster and find out how you can protect them.
Two towering piles of elephant tusks on fire (© Ben Curtis/AP Images)

Stopping criminals who traffic wildlife

Pangolins and rhinos are two of the most trafficked animals in Africa to satisfy intense demand from China. See what America's doing to thwart it.
Radiated tortoise crawling on ground (© Turtle Survival Alliance)

Saving Madagascar’s endangered tortoises during a pandemic

The U.S. government is helping a nonprofit group return Madagascar's endangered tortoises to the wild after the COVID-19 pandemic cost the group funding.
Great blue heron wading through wetlands as sun rises in background (© Suzy Mast)

The U.S. protects wetlands large and small

Coastal and land-bound wetlands cover 5.5 percent of the United States. Learn more about how the U.S. federal and state governments protect them.
Screenshot of brown bear in field with superimposed square around head and triangle from eyes to nose (© Melanie Clapham)

Would you recognize this bear’s face?

New innovations in facial recognition technology are allowing conservationists to identify and better study bears in the wild.
Children watching caged jaguar (© The Asahi Shimbun/Getty Images)

‘Zoohackathon’ innovators seek to stop wildlife trafficking

New innovations developed as part of the U.S. Department of State's annual Zoohackathon aim to combat wildlife trafficking around the world.
Children looking at caged monkeys (© AP Images)

Wildlife trafficking endangers human and animal communities [video]

Global wildlife trafficking hurts animals, people and the environment. The U.S. government is working to stop this illegal business.
Orangutan in tree (© Nature Picture Library/Alamy Stock Photo)

China’s international building projects threaten biodiversity

The People's Republic of China’s One Belt, One Road initiative is destroying habitats and threatening endangered species, according to conservationists.